Wednesday, 4 November 2009

Remember, Remember the Moon of November

Clogged of lung and cloudy of head, 11 days ago I hit the road and headed back to Cornwall for a moonwalk I'd planned over two years ago.

As we all now know, Moonwalking began in Cornwall. It danced around my head while I studied the Professional Writing MA in Falmouth. Wet wet Falmouth. My slightly odd nightwalking habit - walking around after dark and seeing what sort of trouble I could get into - gained a following. Such a following that it sparked huge interest from Susy, my tutor, and other course leaders.

Susy's interest was personal. I soon discovered that she and friends walked secretly once a month by the light of the full moon. We got chatting. I got excited. And I chose to dedicate 2009 to this very pursuit: the pursuit of whatever I could find under full moon. So I asked Susy if I could join her group for a walk in 2008 - a taster, a practice.

She said No.

This wasn't a mean 'no', it turned out. I just wasn't woman enough.

The Head Moon of the Falmouth moonwalkers - who visit the same beach every month and sit and contemplate the full moon as she rises from the sea and arcs overhead - seemed to dislike the idea of a man in the mix, said Susy. Plus when I'd asked, a close friend of the group had been diagnosed with cancer so not a good time for an outsider who might like to try moonwalking to join. It would be sad, reflective. It would be close and personal. I completely understood. Maybe another night. When I had experience and could add something to the ladies' meditative hobby.

And that other night was Monday. I awoke in the morning to squally showers outside; I'd never seen downpours pour quite so horizontally. The wind - oh, the wind. Gulls were being flung into cottages, walkers buffeted by gales that only Cornwall and the Highlands could survive. The moon was a distant dream.

The story of how I came to join the walk must be saved for the book. And the story of the yapping dog and moonlit poetry and men in our lives must also wait. But be prepared - November's moon is full of ups and downs. We're talking health, dreams, love, women, beauty. We're talking poetry, moon chats, Halloween, parties. There's rain, there's cold, there's warmth. There's longing.

And there's a strong feeling of coming to the end. To completing the circuit. So close: so scarily close.

Next month it's ley lines, Stonehenge, lunacy, madness and many miles of walking with a bottle of brandy. And, you never know, maybe that ex-girlfriend by my side.

Once upon a time, a young couple lived in this flat in Falmouth...



Then they didn't live in that flat. And they weren't a young couple. So one of them decided to walk around Britain following this...

 

Over a year he experienced some fantastic adventures. In November, a group of ladies and a dog led the young man to a secluded beach...

 

But he didn't find love this November full moon. Because he was dressed in a strange waterproof lumberjack outfit with very high trousers...

 

...a vest, and braces...

Soon the police came along and locked him up forever more.

8 comments:

Sam Carver said...

The high trouser look didn't hold Simon Cowell back at all!

Rob Self-Pierson said...

I wonder whether the high-trouser look alone got him to where he is today...

St Ives Birds & Photo Journal said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Rob Self-Pierson said...

Hi Richard,

To be honest, I'm not 100% sure if that's the beach. I had no idea where Susy was driving us. But just in case, I've had to hide your message - not sure my new moonwalking friends would be too chuffed if I started sharing their walking location. Hope you understand.

If that is the beach, how on earth did you identify it??

St Ives Birds & Photo Journal said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
St Ives Birds & Photo Journal said...

Sorry, mentioned the name again. I don't think many people actually know the name of it but I understand you'll have to hide the message again.

Rob Self-Pierson said...

Sorry - but yes, goodbye nice comment.

Well done on the investigative work. Just searched the beach online and pretty sure you're right. Bet it's a beautiful spot for night fishing.

St Ives Birds & Photo Journal said...

It is a stunning place for night fishing. I've caught some lovely Bass from there. It's also great for finding lots of different tiny shells including Cowries (in the daytime though ;-))